Jennifer L. Campbell

(BA, MA Memorial University, Newfoundland, PhD The University of Toronto) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at SUNY Potsdam and the Director of the Caravanserai Networks Project. Her research is located in Northern South Asia focusing on the Mughal period, colonial, and post-colonial engagements. Jennifer heads the development new survey methods for analyzing architectural spaces; including the use of three-dimensional digital modeling. Her research interests centre on how and why people occupy specific places through time, why we anchor ourselves and our sense of history to these places, and how “we” present these places as heritage sites and thus shape the direction of historical engagement by the public. Increasingly her work explores the relationship of digital media and internet communication technologies to national identity programs and the development of heritage sites as identity markers. This work is highly impacted by consideration of the political economy and the politics of the digital divide.

Research Interests

Architectural Life Histories, The Reoccuption/Reinterpretation of Space/Place(s), Indentity Formation, Space Syntax/Planning Analysis, 3D Modelling, Digital Media, Landscape, Global Heritage, Holistic Anthropology.

Current Directorships and Appointments

Assistant Professor, Anthropology
Department of Anthropology, SUNY Potsdam, Potsdam NY, U.S.A.
Director
Caravanserai Networks Project
Director
Architectural Heritage of Upstate New York
Research Fellow

Archaeology Centre, University of Toronto
Trent University Archaeological Research Centre
Archaeological Institute of America
National Lecture Program Lecturer

Recent Publications

2014 World Heritage and Sites of Conflict: how the war on terror is affecting heritage in Peshawar, Pakistan. In Identity and Heritage Contemporary Challenges in a Globalized World. Edited by Peter F. Biehl, Douglas Comer, Christopher Prescitt and Hilary A. Soderland. Springer. Pp. 65-71

In Prep. Politics, Economy, and Architecture: The Negotiation of Identity and Social Control along the Grand Trunk Road in Mughal South Asia. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology.