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References

1. Federal Trade Commission. Alcohol Marketing and Advertising: A Report to Congress. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2003.

2. Federal Trade Commission. Alcohol Marketing and Advertising: A Report to Congress. Washington, DC: Federal Trade Commission, 2003. The FTC’s description of CAMY’s “research” is an understatement. In a footnote (#19), the Commission observed that CAMY’s systematic use of different questions for those above and below age 21 almost certainly biased the results and were inappropriate. In ordinary language, the CAMY “research” was deceptive junk science designed to mislead the Commission. It was so defective that it apparently could not legally be used by the FTC.

Readings (Listing does not imply endorsement)

Center for Science in the Public Interest. CSPI on Youth-Targeted Booze Ads. Center for Science in the Public Interest press release, 9-24-02. George Hacker, director of CSPI’s Alcohol Policies Project, attacks the integrity and competence of the FTC.

Center for Science and the Public Interest. FTC Report Misses Mark on Alcopops. Center for Science in the Public Interest press release, 9-9-03. George Hacker, director of CSPI’s Alcohol Policies Project, attacks the FTC for its alleged “incredible naiveté about how advertising works” and for not stopping “an industry with a long and shameful history of preying on kids.”

Center for Science in the Public Interest. “Alcopop” Labels Dupe Consumers and Regulators. Center for Science in the Public Interest (Alcohol Policies Project) press release, 11-5-02. The Center for Science in the Public interest refers to flavored malt beverages (FMBs) or malternatives as “alcopops” for emotional impact.

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Out of Control: Alcohol Advertising Taking Aim at America’s Youth. Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2002. This and the other CAMY reports have been criticized for their lack of scientific peer review and for their serious logical and methodological inadequacies.

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Television: Alcohol‘s Vast Adland. Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2002.

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Overexposed: Youth as a Target of Alcohol Advertising in Magazines. Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2002.

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Radio Daze: Alcohol Ads Tune in Underage Youth. Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2003.

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Exposure of African-American Youth to Alcohol Advertising. Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2003.

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Exposure of Hispanic Youth to Alcohol Advertising. Washington, DC: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, 2003.

Hacker, George, R. Collins and Michael Jacobson. Marketing Booze to Blacks. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1987.

Jacobson, Michael, Robert Atkins and George Hacker. The Booze Merchants: the Inebriating of America. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1983. In this book CSPI began using the theme that alcohol marketing “targets kids.”

Maxwell, B., and Michael Jacobson. Marketing Disease to Hispanics: Alcohol.... Washington, DC: Center for Science in he Public Interest, 1989.

Note: The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) and the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) are both heavily funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, one of the largest in the entire world. The Foundation currently gives over fifty million dollars ($50,000,000) annually to temperance-oriented organizations. To learn more about the foundation, visit The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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