Drinking Alcohol Reduces Endometrial Cancer Risk

Research has demonstrated that women who drink alcohol in moderation have a significantly lower risk of developing endometrial cancer than either abstainers or those who consume over two drinks of alcoholic beverages per day.

The meta-analysis of seven cohort prospective studies involved 1,511,661 women and 6,086 cases of endometrial cancer.

Endometrial cancer begins in the inner lining of the uterus or womb and can metastasize to other parts of the body.

Drinking alcohol in moderation also reduces the risk of kidney cancer, thyroid cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

The bottom line is that the moderate consumption of alcohol is associated with better health and greater longevity than is either abstaining from alcohol or abusing it.

Note: This website makes no suggestions or recommendations regarding drinking alcohol and endometrial cancer or about any other health or medical matter and none should be inferred.

Source:

  • Friberg, E., Orsini, N., Mantzoros, C.S., Wolk, A. Alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. British Journal of Cancer, 2010, 103(1), 2010, 127-131.

Readings on Endometrial Cancer Risk Factors

  • Bravi, F., et al. Food groups and endometrial cancer risk: a case-control study from Italy. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2009, 200(3), 293.
  • Chubak, J., et al. Endometrial cancer risk in estrogen users after switching to estrogen-progestin therapy. Cancer Causes and Control, 2007, 18(9), 1001-1007.
  • Cust, A.E., et al. Dietary carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and endometrial cancer within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Cohort. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2007, 166(8), 912-923.
  • Dal Maso, et al. Circulating adiponectin and endometrial cancer risk. Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 2004, 89(3), 1160-1163.
  • Dalvi, T.M., et al. Dietary patterns, Mediterranean diet, and endometrial cancer risk. Cancer Causes and Control, 2007, 18(9), 957-966.
  • Haiman, C.A., et al. A polymorphism in CYP17 and endometrial cancer risk. Cancer research, 2001, 61(10), 3955-3960.
  • Hormone replacement drug poses endometrial cancer risk. Nursing Times, 2005, 101(19), 8.
  • Horn-Ross, P.L., et al. Phytoestrogen intake and endometrial cancer risk. Obstetrical & Gynecological Survey, 2003, 58(111), 726-727. 58, Part 11 (2003): 726-727.
  • Schildkraut, G.L, et al. Progestin and estrogen potency of combination oral contraceptives and endometrial cancer risk. Gynecologic Oncology, 2006, 103(2), 535.
  • Schindler, A.E. Progestrogen deficiency and endometrial cancer risk. Maturitas, 2009, 62(4), 334.
  • Setiawan, V.W., et al. Racial/ethnic differences in endometrial cancer risk: the multiethnic cohort study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2007, 165(3), 262-270.
  • Setiawan, V.W., et al. Germ line variation at 8q24 and endometrial cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention, 2007, 16(10), 2166-2168.
  • Terry, K., et al. MDM2 SNP309 is associated with endometrial cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention, 2008, 17(4), 983-986.
  • Thomas, C.C., et al. Endometrial cancer risk among younger, overweight women. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2009, 114(1), 22-27.
  • Weiderpass, E., et al. Organochlorines and endometrial cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Cancer Risk, 2000, 9(5), 487-494.
  • Xu, X.O., et al. Animal food intake and cooling methods in relation to endometrial cancer risk in Shanghai. British Journal of Cancer, 2006, 95(11), 1586-1592.

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