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References

1. Califano, Joseph. “Don’t make teen drinking easier,” Washington Post, May 11, 203.

2. Hanson, D.J. Preventing Alcohol Abuse: Alcohol, Culture, and Control. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1995.

3. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Comparison of Drinking Rates and Problems: European Countries and the United States. Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention, 2001.

4. Center for Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Radio Daze: Alcohol Ads Tune In Underage Youth. Washington, DC: Center for Alcohol and Marketing, DATE????

5. Commission on Substance Abuse at Colleges and Universities. Rethinking Rites of Passage: Substance Abuse on American Campuses. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 1994. After reporter Kathy McNamara-Meis investigated, she concluded that CASA‘s "news" that 60% of college women who contracted a sexually transmitted disease did so while under the influence of alcohol "appears to have been pulled from thin air" (p. 21). What about the assertion that 90% of all campus rapes occur when alcohol is being used? CASA "couldn't remember" the source of the statistic, and after exhaustively searching the published research on rape, McNamara-Meis was forced to conclude that "there is none" (p. 22). And the three-fold increase in college women drinking to get drunk from 1977 to 1993? It was a most dubious figure, inconsistent with all nation-wide studies conducted over that time period and was based on an inadequate survey limited to a few colleges in only one state. While the CASA report presented this highly suspect statistic as fact, it failed to mention that the study also found stability in the proportion of frequent heavy drinkers and an 11 percent increase in abstainers! But those findings were not consistent with their doomsday scenario. The assertion that 95% of violent crime on campus is alcohol-related is also highly suspect. It is based on an estimate that 95% of such campus crimes are alcohol or drug-related. But the CASA report disingenuously presented it as a fact referring only to alcohol (p. 23). McNamara-Meis, Kathy. Burned. Forbes MediaCritic, 2, 1995, 20-24.

6. Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. Substance Abuse and Women on Welfare. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 1994.

7. Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. Dangerous Liaisons: Substance Abuse and Sex. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 1999.

8. Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Teen Tipplers: America’s Underage Drinking Epidemic. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 2003.

Readings (Listing does not imply indorsement)

Califano, Joseph. “Don’t make teen drinking easier,” Washington Post, May 11, 203.

Center for Alcohol Marketing and Youth. Radio Daze: Alcohol Ads Tune In Underage Youth. Washington, DC: Center for Alcohol and Marketing, 2003.

Commission on Substance Abuse at Colleges and Universities. Rethinking Rites of Passage: Substance Abuse on American Campuses. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 1994

Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. Substance Abuse and Women on Welfare. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 1994.

Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. Dangerous Liaisons: Substance Abuse and Sex. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 1999.

Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Teen Tipplers: America’s Underage Drinking Epidemic. New York: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 2003.

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Comparison of Drinking Rates and Problems: European Countries and the United States. Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention, 2001.

Reid, T. R. “Let my teenager drink.” Washington Post, May 4, 2003. http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A8079-2003May2

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