Alcohol Policy Conference on Reducing Alcohol-Related Problems

Imagine a conference on reducing alcohol problems in which speakers taught alcohol grant recipients how to get around federal rules against lobbying, promoted world government style UN global rules and controls over alcoholic beverages, called for dramatically higher taxes on alcohol beverages, taught attendees how to get "fees" added to alcohol when they are unable to raise taxes either legally or politically, were critical of parental authority over their own children, denied individual personal responsibility for one's actions, supported old fashioned Blue laws prohibiting the sale of alcohol on Sundays, called for bans on alcohol consumption in public places, opposed alcohol product competition and consumer choice, called for government monopolies to control the sale of all beverage alcohol, suggested deceptive ways to promote government alcohol monopolies, called for the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to ban alcohol ads in magazines, proposed a system for inflating or exaggerating the problems caused by alcohol abuse, and even screamed at attendees with whom they disagreed and called on them to leave the conference.

All of this happened at the federally-funded Alcohol Policy Conference recently held in Washington, DC. This was the fifteenth such conference held around the country over the past three decades. Taxpayers' money should not be used to fund such a circus. Ideologically driven zealots have the right to free speech, which must always be protected. However, taxpayers shouldn't foot the bill.

With fiscal crises facing the country, a no-brainer to save tax money is not to fund any more such fiascos.

 

Readings and Resources on Alcohol Policy Conference:

  • (Listed chronologically. Listing does not imply endorsement.)
  • Michele Simon and Sara Mart. (Marin Institute) Alcohol Industry 101. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Bruce Livingston and Sarah Mart (Marin Institute) Building a charge for harm alliance: Campaigning to hold big alcohol accountable. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Robert Ponicki. Alcohol outlets and motor vehicle crashes. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Alexander Wagenaar and Vincent DeMarco. The best but toughest to enact: Raising alcohol prices. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Traci Toomey, Ted Mahoney, Bernardo Rosa and Deliah Heller. Alcohol's "built environment." Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Janet Williams, Frank Chalouka, and Vincent DeMarco. How to raise alcoholtaxes utilizing lessons from tobacco tax campaigns. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • John Clapp, Kathleen Lippitt, and Robert Hall. Examining the San Giego alcohol beach ban. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Tim Stockwell, William Kerr, Petra Meier, Norman Giesbrecht,and Thomas
    Greenfield. Regulaing the physical and economic availability of alcohol. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Robert Saltz, Brandon Busteed, Robert Nash Parker, Traci Toomey, and Thomas Workman. Alcohol Prevention: What's our problem? Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Samantha Cukier and Norman Giesbrecht. Measuring the second-hand effects of drinking. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.
  • Steven Schmidt, William Kerr, Andrew Murie (MADD Canada), and Michele Simon (Marin Institute). Who's in control? The state of state alcohol monopolies. Policies for Reducing Problems Associated with Alcohol Availability. Program Book. Alcohol Policies conference. Washington, DC, December 5-7, 2010.

filed under: Prohibition

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